Photomatix

Reworking Nymans Ruins Again

Reworking Nymans Ruins Again

A coloured photograph of Nymans Ruins taken back in July 2012.

A coloured photograph of Nymans Ruins taken back in July 2012.

 

I was just going through some of our very first photographs taken back in 2012… and looking at how my processing techniques have changed… since I learnt how to use Photoshop and Lightroom to its full advantages.

The above photograph was originally posted in a post called Nyman’s Ruins and reworked it again in 2013 in this posts Rework of Nyman’s Ruins.  One of the things I didn’t like was the bush in the bottom right hand corner… and the long lever on the gate… so with the powers of Photoshop I used the spot healing brush to remove the lever from the bushes and then I copied and pasted a portion of the gate into the right hand corner and then flipped it… just so that it looked like there was another gate.

Aphotograph of Nymans Ruins taken back in July 2012.

A monochrome photograph of Nymans Ruins taken back in July 2012.

 

The image was created using automatic exposure bracketing… and merged together in Photomatix… once it was toned-mapped it was then sent to Photoshop for the alterations I wanted to do… then back into Lightroom for the main processing…. Once I was happy with the image.. I then decided to see what it looked like in Black and White… so I just clicked on the B&W button in the HSL/Color/B&W panel..

How has your processing changed over the years?  Do you find, like I do, you go through phases of creating images to a certain style or have you just stuck to your one style of processing?  I would love to hear what other people think… and how their processing techniques have changed.

A monochrome Photography of the ruins at Nymans in East Sussex.

A monochrome Photography of the ruins at Nymans in East Sussex.

 

The above photograph was taken at the rear of Nyman’s ruins…. you can see the extent of the fire damage that happened in 1947.

The severe reduction of staff in World War II was followed in 1947 by a disastrous fire in the house, which survives as a garden ruin. The house was partially rebuilt and became the home of Leonard Messel’s daughter Anne Messel and her second husband the 6th Earl of Rosse. At Leonard Messel’s death in 1953 it was willed to the National Trust with 275 acres of woodland, one of the first gardens taken on by the Trust. Lady Rosse continued to serve as Garden Director.

Wikipedia

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Posted by Bren in Photography, 2 comments
Country roads… take me home

Country roads… take me home

Taken by Bren Ryan

Taken by Bren Ryan

This photograph was taken by St Margaret’s Church in High Halstow, near Rochester, Kent and composed of 6 photos at different exposures.  I then merged them in Photomatix and added an autumn tone to the picture, by using a preset in Photomatix and once the photograph was re-imported back to Lightroom I then adjusted the tones and added split toning to achieve the above effect.

Weekly Photo Challenge – April 1st – Landscape

Posted by Bren in Landscape, Photography, 2 comments
Chartwell.. standing for ages

Chartwell.. standing for ages

img_2246hdr1

Chartwell .. standing for ages

Yesterday, I decided to delve into HDR photography a little bit more.  I had been using Corel Paintshop Pro to merge my bracketed photos, but running that and trying to run Lightroom at the same time seemed to slow my work flow down.

Anyway I went to the Adobe site and found the write up about the LR/Enfuse plugin. Continue reading →

Posted by Bren in Architecture, Landscape, Photography, 2 comments
Bateman’s House

Bateman’s House

Bateman’s House

Back in June 2012, we decided to visit Bateman’s the former home of Rudyard Kipling.  I had been playing around with auto-bracketing on my Panasonic Lumix FZ-48 camera, and as I captured the house, I thought it would be an ideal HDR image. Continue reading →

Posted by Bren in Architecture, Photography, 2 comments