Doddington Place


Woodland at Doddington

Doddington Place Gardens is part of a 850 acres (3,400,000 m2) Edwardian estate, located on the edge of Doddington village, near Faversham in Kent, UK.

The Grade II listed Victorian mansion was built in 1870 for Sir John Croft (son of Sir John Croft, 1st Baronet ) by the architect Charles Brown Trollope.

In 1873, Markham Nesfield (1842-74), (son of the better known garden designer William Andrews Nesfield) designed the formal terrace next to the house for Sir John Croft. Unfortunately nothing remains now of his detailed planting plans.

In 1906, the Crofts sold Doddington Place and the estate to General and Mrs. Douglas Jeffreys. Who added the rock garden and she was also responsible for planting about a mile of box hedging. Then their nephew inherited the estate, John Richard Anthony Oldfield (MP) and his wife Jonnet Elizabeth Richards added to the garden. He died aged 100 at Doddington. The current owner is Richard Oldfield, cousin of John Oldfield, Richard Oldfield is the Executive Chairman of the asset management company Oldfield Partners and is the Vice Lord Lieutenant of Kent, as well as being the President of the Faversham Society. The estate suffered extensive damage in the Great Storm of 1987. Around 60 trees were damaged in the garden alone.

The gardens have been open in aid of the National Gardens Scheme for more than fifty years.

Wikipedia

 


Address
Church Lane,
Sittingbourne, Kent
ME9 0BB


 

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Written by Bren (RyanPhotography)

Bren Ryan is a female amateur photographer and blogger who along with her husband, Ashley, have created a photography blog called RyanPhotography which showcases the places they've visited on their photography journey. Bren and Ashley primarily concentrate their photographic skills on landscape, architecture and floral subjects. Based in the South East of England they hope to give their readers an insight into the wonderful and beautiful landscapes, buildings and places that the South of England has to offer.

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